Reflecting on my Reflective Practice – Making the Implicit Explicit

As I write this reflective blog post, I sit in an airport awaiting my flight. With technology, having the ability to quickly document my thoughts and feelings as they occur may be a critical piece in allowing me to capture my reflective practice as it happens.

As I write this reflective blog post, I sit in an airport awaiting my flight. With technology, having the ability to quickly document my thoughts and feelings as they occur may be a critical piece in allowing me to capture my reflective practice as it happens.

Over the next year I will be completing a series of online courses through Charles Sturt University. During this time of course work I will be engaging in reflective journalling and with my personal interest in technology, I want to be able to draw upon a number applications and platforms that may help facilitate a deeper and more consistent practice of reflection. The practicality and integrity of these electronic methods will also be reflected upon as I try to determine the most effective way for me to journal my reflections.

In general I do not schedule in times for personal, professional reflection. For me, I find that moments of reflection are spontaneous often fuelled by an event or experience that either challenges my current beliefs, contradicts my expectations or yields surprising or unexpected results. Currently, my process of reflection is not formalized in any way as I do not subscribe to a particular format or timeline. Up until now documentation has been in the form of an occasional brief note to myself, a blog post or tweet. Many times my own reflections remain to be a process where my thoughts are never really articulated in writing and/or documented for future reference.

Having said that, I do not believe that I am new to the practice of reflection. My process may be less formal without the consistent use of an organizer and platform for documentation but I have come to truly appreciate the improvements that reflective practice has provided me as I improve my work as a teacher and educational leader. However as I try to stretch my own development to be more explicit in my reflective practice, I do stand to engage in self reflection that is more focussed, influential and pervasive. Investing in a record of reflection over the course of the next year will provide me the opportunity to see where I have come and hopefully the improvements and learnings I have encountered.

Author: K. Takahashi

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